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Josh Canter


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Josh Canter


 
 

Born in Southern California...

But living in Austin, Texas makes for a unique mix. Not so unique, Josh moved to the state capital for a job. Not purely motivated by a new career, but also by the draw of a new space. 

 
 
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pizza biting


pizza biting


and

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music vibing


music vibing


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Online Content Creative


Online Content Creative


Still, the Iran deal is among the most active conversations on Twitter, and both sides have been posting. One group backed by Secure America Now posted what could be the first 15-second political-attack video tweet, complete with terrifying imagery and creepy voice-over.
— AdWeek, This Creepy Ad Brings an Old Political Tactic to Twitter After Iran Deal, http://www.adweek.com/news/technology/creepy-ad-brings-old-political-tactic-twitter-after-iran-deal-165870
‘We believe this will be effective because it’s reaching young voters that aren’t normally reached,’ said Josh Canter, a senior account executive at Harris Media who helped create the filter, in an email to The Hill. ‘These are people that don’t watch Fox News or CNN, but are on Snapchat multiple times per day.’
— The Hill, In first, Snapchat used as ad to oppose Iran deal, http://thehill.com/policy/national-security/251439-in-first-snapchat-used-as-ad-to-oppose-iran-deal
But it is not Snapchat taking a political position and creating that filter — it is Secure America Now, a foreign policy advocacy group that paid Snapchat to place the filter in the list of ones available to Ohio users.

It is a rather nontraditional method of advertising, one that is slightly risky as it requires users to put the content out there on the network themselves, rather than groups relying on a guaranteed video spot. But it fits in with Snapchat’s rather nontraditional social media platform, an example of the expanding options available to political advertisers who are often clawing for a way to stand out in the digital sphere.

The filter is just a part of what could be one of Snapchat’s biggest nights in the political advertising arena.
— The New York Times, The Political Ad Wars Come to Snapchat, http://www.nytimes.com/live/republican-debate-election-2016-cleveland/the-political-ad-wars-come-to-snapchat/
Sponsored by an organization called Secure America Now, a conservative foreign policy nonprofit, the ad appears to users not as a video, but as a filter—the decals Snapchat users can slap on a photo or video before sending it. Framed by that filter, users are supposed to take a picture that reflects how they feel “about the bad Iran deal.
— WIRED, Snapchat's Weird New Political Ad Is Evil Genius, https://www.wired.com/2015/08/snapchat-iran-deal/